Internet 3.0: Ten Problems with Current Internet Architecture and Solutions for the Next Generation
Raj Jain
, Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, Washington University in Saint Louis, USA

Making High-end Visualization be in tune with High-end Parallel Computation

Dr Martin J. Turner, University of Manchester

 

Beat-Rest Pulsing for Impulse Radio Communications

Masaru Kamada, Department of Computer and Information Sciences, Ibaraki University, Hitachi, Japan

 

Internet 3.0: Ten Problems with Current Internet Architecture and Solutions for the Next Generation
Raj Jain, Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, Washington University in Saint Louis

 

ABSTRACT

Internet has changed the way we work and live and has contributed positively to the growth of business and industry.  Nonetheless, many parts of the Internet architecture were developed 30+ years ago.  In these 30 years, we have learnt a lot about networking and packet switching.  Is this the way we would design the Internet if we were to start it now? This talk is an attempt to answer this question raised by US National Science Foundation, which has embarked on the design of the next generation Internet testbed called GENI.

In this talk, we will point out key problems with the current Internet Architecture and proposed directions for the solutions.  In particular, the next generation of Internet has to be commerce friendly.  It has to be designed to meet the needs of businesses, organizations, and governments.  The first generation was designed by researchers for research.  The design team did an excellent job resulting in its adoption by the masses.  The next generation Internet should build on this success, keep the best ideas of the past and add features that will help businesses, organizations, and governments utilize it in the same way they utilize other methods of communication and transport and have the same or superior level of flexibility.  Ten such problems and proposed solutions will be presented in this talk.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Raj Jain is a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at Washington University, St.  Louis, MO.  Dr.  Jain is a Fellow of IEEE, a Fellow of ACM.  He has served on the Board of Technical Advisors to several companies including Nexabit Networks, Westborough, MA acquired by Lucent Corporation.  (March 1997-1999), Amber Networks, Fremont, CA acquired by Nokia (1999-2001).

He is the author of ``Art of Computer Systems Performance Analysis,’’ which won the 1991 ``Best-Advanced How-to Book, Systems'' award from Computer Press Association.  His fourth book entitled " High-Performance TCP/IP: Concepts, Issues, and Solutions," was published by Prentice Hall in November 2003.

Based on his active participation in the computer industry, Dr. Jain was awarded 1999 siliconindia Leadership Awards for Excellence and Promise in Business and Technology.  He is also a winner of ACM SIGCOMM Test of Time award.

For his publications and talks, see http://www.cse.wustl.edu/~jain/

 

 

 

Making High-end Visualization be in tune with High-end Parallel Computation

 

Dr Martin J. Turner, University of Manchester

  

 

Pen Portrait

Dr Martin Turner is currently the Visualization Team Leader within Research Computing Services at The University of Manchester and gained his PhD in the Computer Laboratory, at Cambridge University. Related to e-Science and Grid infrastructure he has worked as project manager for the JISC funded CSAGE VRE1, PI for the EPSRC OMII-UK funded Access Grid Portalisation project and is manager of the NW spoke for the JISC funded vizNET (UK National Visualization Support Network) programme. He has worked on the management and development of web-based visualization portals for the Grid GEMEDA economics census data (NCeSS National Centre for e-Social Science), as well as a Linguistic avatar based Virtual Manchester Campus (Distance Learning Fund). As a service the centre runs the internal High Performance Visualization machines for the University, as well as coordinates extreme power-viz systems, via commercial interest through notably KGT Inc. (Knowledge Graphics Technology, Japan).

 

Research interests cover a broad background, specialising in many Visualization Themes, Computer Graphics and Mathematical topics associated with image and signal creation, analysis, processing and presentation. Teaching has covered all academic levels from undergraduate to postgraduate as well as within external courses, involving the RAF and British Gas; and currently he is an Honorary Lecturer within the School of Computer Sciences at the University of Manchester. Research in these fields has resulted in a short-term Fellowship with British Telecom, a published book `Fractal Geometry in Digital Imaging' by Academic Press as well as over 75 other publications, and he has supervised to completion eight successful MPhil/PhD students.

 

He is a member of the BCS, OSA, IEEE, IMA (CMath MIMA CSci), EG and an executive Member and Treasurer of the Eurographics UK Chapter as well as a committee member for the ACM SIGGRAPH UK Professional Chapter.

 

http://www.rcs.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/people/turner

martin.turner@manchester.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

Beat-Rest Pulsing for Impulse Radio Communications

 

Masaru Kamada, Department of Computer and Information Sciences, Ibaraki University, Hitachi, Japan

 

ABSTRACT

 

A practical approach is presented for fast impulse-radio ultra-wide-bandwidth communications. It employs a train of overlapping time-limited pulses that are orthogonal to one another. For the sake of practicability, we assume that each pulse is shaped through a common bandpass filter excited by a staircase function. Instead of sending the pulses at the maximum rate, we transmit them every other clock interval, i.e., in the beat-and-rest rhythm. This relaxing rhythm halves the transmission rate but brings in the properties of being time-limited and orthogonal, which are crucial for real-time and robust detection of the received pulses, respectively. We obtain an example pulse which complies with the FCC regulation for indoor ultra-wide-bandwidth radio communications. This talk is based on the speaker's joint work with Semih Özlem and Hiromasa Habuchi

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

Masaru Kamada was born in Hitachi, Ibaraki, Japan in 1962. He received the bachelor's (1984), master's (1986) and doctoral (1988) degrees in engineering from the University of Tsukuba and worked for the same university as a faculty member. In 1992, he joined Ibaraki University where he is currently a professor of computer science. He was a post-doc at the mathematics department of ETH Zürich for 1993-95. Dr. Kamada serves Sampling Theory in Signal and Image Processing as the journal's secretary since 2003. He has been working mainly on sampling and approximation theory with several real-world applications. To the cyberworlds, his contributions include an object-oriented programming language for children and protocols for gaming and computer forensics.